Kyi Leo Dog

The Kyi-Leo is a small yet sturdy rare dog breed originating from the crossing of a Maltese and a Lhasa Apso. It is also known as a Maltese Lion dog, and is often confused with the lhasa-maltese hybrids or Lhatese.
Lifespan: 13 – 15 years
Mass: 4.1 – 6.4 kg (Adult)
Height: 20 – 30 cm (Adult)
Scientific name: Canis lupus familiaris
Temperament: Obedient, Playful, Quiet, Active, Calm, Forgiving
Colors: Blue Belton, Gold & White

Description

The Kyi-Leo® Dog is a small but solid dog. It is well boned for its size with good muscle tone. Light on his feet and very quick. The tail curls over the back when the dog is alert. The eyes are dark and the nose is black. The teeth meet in a scissors bite. The forelegs are long and straight. The coat is long and thick, and either hangs straight or is slightly wavy. There is a natural part that tends to form along the spine. Its coat may take up to 3 or 4 years to grow to full length. About 99% of Kyi-Leo® Dogs are black and white, and they occasionally change to silver/grey and white. The head is completely covered with long hair. It has a profuse beard and whiskers.

Temperament

The Kyi-Leo® Dog is known for its liveliness and catlike quickness. It is said to be able to grasp objects with its front paws. Alert, playful, gentle and people-oriented, it bonds closely with its immediate family. Good with children if the humans are the dog’s 100% pack leader. Children need to be taught how to be kind to the dog, but also how to display leadership toward the dog. The Kyi-Leo is good with other dogs as well as non-canine pets. This little dog is full of voice and energy, making a good watchdog. The breed is extremely affectionate and is always eager to please. Socialize it with people and noises at an early age to avoid it being wary of strangers. This breed needs gentle, firm obedience training. Make sure you are this dog’s firm, confident, consistent pack leader to avoid Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behavior problems, which include stubbornness. Always remember, dogs are canines, not humans. Be sure to meet their natural instincts as animals.